6 tools to get started with responsive web design

Nowadays – when building a website – one is confronted with a number of different sizes and browsers that is daunting.* Plus, with mobile adoption skyrocketing, the diversity of mobile devices on the market doesn’t fail to grow exponentially. Thank god / the vivid web design community no custom coding is needed for each device or screen size with current responsive web design frameworks and testing tools.

We’ve selected 6 tools and libraries to get you started with responsive web design:

Bootstrap

Built at Twitter by Mark Otto and Jacob Thornton, Bootstrap offers an easy configurable CSS front-end framework. Bootstrap was made to not only look and behave great in the latest desktop browsers (as well as IE7!), but also in tablet and smartphone browsers with a 12-column responsive grid, dozens of components, JavaScript plugins, typography, form controls, and has a web-based Customizer. Bootstrap comes in different shapes and forms, like Google BootstrapRetriever Bootstrap and the super fun (and equally ugly) Geo Bootstrap. Continue Reading “6 tools to get started with responsive web design”

An Intro to Responsive Web Design

Responsive Web Design (RWD) is a design approach aimed at crafting sites to provide an optimal viewing experience. That means: easy reading and navigation with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling across a gradient of different devices. At Usersnap we think a great deal of Responsive Design. Simply re-size your browser window, or open this blog on your smartphone, and you’ll know what we’re talking about.

Ethan Marcotte coined the term responsive web design in a May 2010 article in A List Apart. He then described the theory and practice of responsive web design in his 2011 book Responsive Web Design. Subsequently, Responsive Web Design was listed second in Top Web Design Trends for 2012 by .net magazine. Mashable called 2013 the Year of Responsive Web Design, as they see a ‘major shift in the consumption habits of their audience: Continue Reading “An Intro to Responsive Web Design”

Agile development with OnTime and Usersnap


OnTime
started, as so many great products and tools, as a solution to a personal pain. As a senior consultant and project manager, Hamid Shojaee, built OnTime for himself, to track who in his team was working on what, in an agile way. Today, OnTime has grown to a mature project management suite, particularly powerful to manage scrum projects, sprints and teams while maintaining a perfect overview of every project’s progress.

OnTime’s products are designed from the ground up to be easy to use with built-in tutorials and plenty of supporting resources. In this blog post, I’ll show how to add an easy way to continuously receive visual feedback in OnTime with Usersnap.

Continue Reading “Agile development with OnTime and Usersnap”

Grab your Usersnap jQuery plugin on GitHub

For everyone who doesn’t want to dig around in their source code to add the JavaScript snippet needed to get Usersnap up and running on your site: there is a plugin for that! You can grab our jQuery plugin at GitHub.

There is even a full example page explaining the jQuery plugin inside the
repo: example.html. Add the small plugin, in the jQuery syntax you’re already comfortable with, and there’s no need to mess around in your front-end. All the more time to focus on growing your business!

We invite you to try out our service for free. Sign up for our 15-days trial program!

How to build Customer Communities

Customer Communities for Dummies by Wendy LeaProbably the most sensible way to leverage screenshot functionality is in building customer communities. Social media best practice is moving toward proactively managed enterprise communities that benefit from many of the features of traditional, consumer social media (and also enjoy many enhancements). Consumers appreciate your Facebook page, and might be willing to hit ‘like’ every now and then, but they don’t always appreciate discussions from their brand of dish soap popping up on their private wall.

Managed customer communities are proven to lower customer support costs. Customers develop a large repository of FAQ and support material that is easily managed and analyzed through a platform such as Get Satisfaction. An excellent primer in customer community building was written by Get Satisfaction’s CEO, Wendy Lea, who has been a great advocate for the evolution of enterprise social media away from the fuzzy metrics of the FB page, and toward active, managed communities with a measurable impact on ROI. Continue Reading “How to build Customer Communities”

Enterprise CFOs: here’s how to reduce customer service costs

It’s taken a while for enterprises to realize how best to use social media. Sales metrics, return on marketing investment and ROI don’t often synchronize well with the vocabulary of the early 2010’s social media expert, whose ‘share of voice’, ‘engagement’, and ‘nurturing advocacy’ make smoke come out of the ears of 90% of CFOs.

social media and customer service costs

Here is an example of where things can get weird. My good friend Media Czar (coincidentally also one of the greatest social media and marketing minds of his generation) sums it up nicely in his blog ‘The Magic Bean Lab’. Media Czar points out that most of the metrics and ideas used to describe the effectiveness of social media don’t mean anything. But there are two important measures that don’t often feature prominently enough in any enterprise social media conversation: reducing costs, and increasing sales.

I’m going to focus on reducing costs, because that’s what I know most about. Continue Reading “Enterprise CFOs: here’s how to reduce customer service costs”

Eric Meyer: we’ve got the solution for your problem!

Eric Meyer, a renown web consultant, wrote a post on the problem of receiving and processing feedback on his own blog, meyerweb.com, and highlighting small things like typos on other blogs, without writing lengthy emails. “As I was reading an article with a few scattered apostrophe errors, I wished that I could highlight each one, hit a report button, and know that the author had been notified of the errors so that they could fix them.  No requirement to leave a comment chastising them for bad grammar, replete with lots of textual context so they could find the errors. (…)”

Continue Reading “Eric Meyer: we’ve got the solution for your problem!”