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Google’s tech alone didn’t build them into a top company, User Research matters too!

Creatively exploring market preferences is critical for success. Google first gained an initial foothold and held onto it through such evaluations. Such insight, and their acquisition of such continues broadening, then helps informs competitive user engagement strategies. User loyalty is the natural result.

Imagine, for a moment, Google was a condominium with over two billion residents. Do these residents want identical floor plans, fixtures, etc? Definitely not!

Instead, research first helped Google emphasize user personalization. Critical for their expansion, doing so also established current tech trends.

Keep reading for info on Google’s current user research. We will cover study templates, focuses, and trajectory among other facets.

In 2002 the software world looked quite different.

Bugzilla was the main bug tracking tool available, and a small company named Atlassian just launched their software, named JIRA.

JIRA, in reference to Gojira (Japanese for Godzilla), was intended to be a modern alternative to the market leader Bugzilla. Fast forward to 2018: JIRA is used by more than 75,000 customers globally, who use JIRA for their entire software development lifecycle.

While all sorts of department and teams use JIRA, its core use case is still its issue tracking and ticketing functionality.

And with this article, we show you how to collect feedback from colleagues, and track bugs with JIRA more effectively.

If you are like me you would rather try to balance a laptop, coffee mug, charger, mouse, and your notes all at once rather than walking from your desk to the conference room twice.

A similar dynamic is at work when it comes to managing feedback or planning and tracking software development processes. You want to easily prioritize and assign a task and if possible – tackle multiple tasks at once.

That’s where our new feature comes in: Bulk Editing. Bulk Editing is a fast, flexible new way for you and your team to collaborate, manage, and organize internal or external feedback.

There’s a ton of great content out there on how to onboard new users, how to treat them well, and how to make sure that they understand your product, its benefits, and become paying customers.

However, there’s less information available on how you should treat your users who want to end the relationship with you.

We at Usersnap looked into the topic of user offboarding and provide you with the following essentials for how to end relationships with your customers and users.

You’ve finished some design drafts for a new website. You’ve even shipped those new designs to your website. And now you wonder what people – your website visitors – think about those new changes.

In this post, I’m going to show you 9 creative ways to ask your website visitors for feedback which will help you increase the quantity and quality of gained feedback.

User feedback and testing probably isn’t a high priority for you when working on your new landing page or web application. But it’s something you should take into consideration before heading in the wrong direction with your newly launched landing page.

Collecting & managing feedback or user complaints on website issues doesn’t always require the use of a large bug tracking or feedback system. For many (especially) small- and medium-sized companies, on-site feedback widgets are sufficient.

So stop being lazy with ad-hoc feedback from colleagues and customers.

Working on new design drafts and website prototypes take a lot of patience and knowledge. When you consider the feedback part of the process it takes even longer.

Email threads, Slack chats, phone calls and meetings – that’s how the feedback is collected and managed. Well, managed? I guess managing feedback through all these channels is barely possible. But here’s the good news.

We are going to show you how to set up your design- & feedback workflow for making feedback from colleagues and customers actionable and manageable again.

There are several lists on web design mistakes out there. Most of them focus on the web design itself but forget about other components such as how a good design becomes a great design through the right way of collecting feedback.

There’s always a feedback stage in the web design process which requires intensive interaction between co-workers, as well as external clients. And as in every intense interaction there’s plenty of room for improvement.

 

Heroku is among the best cloud application platforms on the web and lets app developers spend their time on their application code, not managing servers, deployment, ongoing operations, or scaling. It allows for agile deployment for Ruby, Node.js, Clojure, Java, Python, and Scala – up and running in minutes. Of course, a full git support is included. No hassling around with servers, instances, or VMs again.

Plus, Heroku is not only a cloud platform but maintains and curates an avid ecosystem of Add-Ons. Usersnap was recently added to this Add-on ecosystem: Usersnap add-on for Heroku. Rather than using Usersnap as a separate service to make your life as a developer a whole lot easier you can now simply add it as Heroku Add-on. You will get screenshots during your development process to fix bugs faster and have more time working on new features!

Adding the Usersnap add-on for Heroku

It’s easy to attach Usersnap to a Heroku application via the command line interface:

$ heroku addons:add usersnap