Responsive Web Design (RWD) is a design approach aimed at crafting sites to provide an optimal viewing experience. That means: easy reading and navigation with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling across a gradient of different devices. At Usersnap we think a great deal of Responsive Design. Simply re-size your browser window, or open this blog on your smartphone, and you’ll know what we’re talking about.

Ethan Marcotte coined the term responsive web design in a May 2010 article in A List Apart. He then described the theory and practice of responsive web design in his 2011 book Responsive Web Design. Subsequently, Responsive Web Design was listed second in Top Web Design Trends for 2012 by .net magazine. Mashable called 2013 the Year of Responsive Web Design, as they see a ‘major shift in the consumption habits of their audience:


OnTime
started, as so many great products and tools, as a solution to a personal pain. As a senior consultant and project manager, Hamid Shojaee, built OnTime for himself, to track who in his team was working on what, in an agile way. Today, OnTime has grown to a mature project management suite, particularly powerful to manage scrum projects, sprints and teams while maintaining a perfect overview of every project’s progress.

OnTime’s products are designed from the ground up to be easy to use with built-in tutorials and plenty of supporting resources. In this blog post, I’ll show how to add an easy way to continuously receive visual feedback in OnTime with Usersnap.

Customizing the feedback button to your needs is easy with our snippet configurator. For every site you use Usersnap with you can alter the button text, the position of that button and the language of the Usersnap menu. Additionally, you can select which three tools you want your customers to use when giving feedback, and if they can leave their email address or a comment:

For everyone who doesn’t want to dig around in their source code to add the JavaScript snippet needed to get Usersnap up and running on your site: there is a plugin for that! You can grab our jQuery plugin at GitHub.

There is even a full example page explaining the jQuery plugin inside the
repo: example.html. Add the small plugin, in the jQuery syntax you’re already comfortable with, and there’s no need to mess around in your front-end. All the more time to focus on growing your business!

We invite you to try out our service for free. Sign up for our 15-days trial program!

Customer Communities for Dummies by Wendy LeaProbably the most sensible way to leverage screenshot functionality is in building customer communities. Social media best practice is moving toward proactively managed enterprise communities that benefit from many of the features of traditional, consumer social media (and also enjoy many enhancements). Consumers appreciate your Facebook page, and might be willing to hit ‘like’ every now and then, but they don’t always appreciate discussions from their brand of dish soap popping up on their private wall.

Managed customer communities are proven to lower customer support costs. Customers develop a large repository of FAQ and support material that is easily managed and analyzed through a platform such as Get Satisfaction. An excellent primer in customer community building was written by Get Satisfaction’s CEO, Wendy Lea, who has been a great advocate for the evolution of enterprise social media away from the fuzzy metrics of the FB page, and toward active, managed communities with a measurable impact on ROI.

It’s taken a while for enterprises to realize how best to use social media. Sales metrics, return on marketing investment and ROI don’t often synchronize well with the vocabulary of the early 2010’s social media expert, whose ‘share of voice’, ‘engagement’, and ‘nurturing advocacy’ make smoke come out of the ears of 90% of CFOs.

social media and customer service costs

Here is an example of where things can get weird. My good friend Media Czar (coincidentally also one of the greatest social media and marketing minds of his generation) sums it up nicely in his blog ‘The Magic Bean Lab’. Media Czar points out that most of the metrics and ideas used to describe the effectiveness of social media don’t mean anything. But there are two important measures that don’t often feature prominently enough in any enterprise social media conversation: reducing costs, and increasing sales.

I’m going to focus on reducing costs, because that’s what I know most about.