Customizing the feedback button to your needs is easy with our snippet configurator. For every site you use Usersnap with you can alter the button text, the position of that button and the language of the Usersnap menu. Additionally, you can select which three tools you want your customers to use when giving feedback, and if they can leave their email address or a comment:

For everyone who doesn’t want to dig around in their source code to add the JavaScript snippet needed to get Usersnap up and running on your site: there is a plugin for that! You can grab our jQuery plugin at GitHub.

There is even a full example page explaining the jQuery plugin inside the
repo: example.html. Add the small plugin, in the jQuery syntax you’re already comfortable with, and there’s no need to mess around in your front-end. All the more time to focus on growing your business!

We invite you to try out our service for free. Sign up for our 15-days trial program!

Customer Communities for Dummies by Wendy LeaProbably the most sensible way to leverage screenshot functionality is in building customer communities. Social media best practice is moving toward proactively managed enterprise communities that benefit from many of the features of traditional, consumer social media (and also enjoy many enhancements). Consumers appreciate your Facebook page, and might be willing to hit ‘like’ every now and then, but they don’t always appreciate discussions from their brand of dish soap popping up on their private wall.

Managed customer communities are proven to lower customer support costs. Customers develop a large repository of FAQ and support material that is easily managed and analyzed through a platform such as Get Satisfaction. An excellent primer in customer community building was written by Get Satisfaction’s CEO, Wendy Lea, who has been a great advocate for the evolution of enterprise social media away from the fuzzy metrics of the FB page, and toward active, managed communities with a measurable impact on ROI.

It’s taken a while for enterprises to realize how best to use social media. Sales metrics, return on marketing investment and ROI don’t often synchronize well with the vocabulary of the early 2010’s social media expert, whose ‘share of voice’, ‘engagement’, and ‘nurturing advocacy’ make smoke come out of the ears of 90% of CFOs.

social media and customer service costs

Here is an example of where things can get weird. My good friend Media Czar (coincidentally also one of the greatest social media and marketing minds of his generation) sums it up nicely in his blog ‘The Magic Bean Lab’. Media Czar points out that most of the metrics and ideas used to describe the effectiveness of social media don’t mean anything. But there are two important measures that don’t often feature prominently enough in any enterprise social media conversation: reducing costs, and increasing sales.

I’m going to focus on reducing costs, because that’s what I know most about.

Eric Meyer, a renown web consultant, wrote a post on the problem of receiving and processing feedback on his own blog, meyerweb.com, and highlighting small things like typos on other blogs, without writing lengthy emails. “As I was reading an article with a few scattered apostrophe errors, I wished that I could highlight each one, hit a report button, and know that the author had been notified of the errors so that they could fix them.  No requirement to leave a comment chastising them for bad grammar, replete with lots of textual context so they could find the errors. (…)”

In the spirit of eating one’s own dog food, I installed the Usersnap plugin for WordPress on my blog. Not only can I now send myself annotated screenshots of things I should really tackle when I’ll work on my website next, creating a very visual to do list, but additionally my readers can highlight typos or widgetty stuff they’d like to see improved. And I can collect that feedback in one place, in a separate folder in my inbox. Which is great, because I used to receive feedback scattered all over the place. My mom would send me a direct message on Twitter, issuing me to ‘mind my language’, and grammar enthusiasts would directly mention me or reply to the post in question. Which doesn’t look all that professional, and blocks discussions on the actual topic of the post.

All in all, Usersnap made my life as a blogger easier. Let me walk you trough the – dead easy – set up. I downloaded the plugin and uploaded it to my ftp-server. You could also just download it directly in the WordPress Plugin environment, I just like to have a copy of everything I use in a folder on my computer.

Then I activated the plugin in the plugins directory of my blog.