Mistakes are inevitable. We’re only human, after all. But when it comes to delivering software or websites to our clients, we want to make that happen with as few errors as possible. It sounds like a great goal, but how do you systematically achieve it?

The key to minimizing errors is to design a quality assurance process that is efficient and reliable. In this article, I discuss exactly how to do that, whether your company is big or small or a one (wo)man show.

Every step should be designed with that simple point in mind, that we are in fact only human. Even the most detail-oriented person will be more effective with a clear and consistent system than relying on their skill alone.

Yes. It’s that time of the year, again. In a couple of days the Usersnap team is flying over to Helsinki, Finland.

Besides us, 15.000 tech companies, startups, and investors are flying over as well.

As we’re getting ready for the Slush and packing our bags, we prepared this personal guide for the Slush 16. So, here’s everything you need to know to get the most out of your Slush experience.

According to statistics, it only takes 1/10th of a second for us to form a first impression about a person; and websites are no different.

Google’s 2012 study entitled “The role of visual complexity and prototypicality regarding the first impression of websites: Working towards understanding aesthetic judgments” confirmed that it takes less than 50 milliseconds for users to form an opinion about your website. In other words: after only 0.05 seconds the average user has already decided whether he should stay on your website or leave it.

First impressions do matter. The first impression a user gets from your website depends on many factors, such as the structure, the spacing, the fonts and, of course, the colors and color combinations you display on your page.

Long-scrolling websites, i.e. sites that let you scroll down for an extended amount of time, have been around for years.

The reason? Users love them!

That isn’t about to change, which is why we wanted to give you some tips and best practices in this article. Because long-scrolling or infinite-scrolling alone doesn’t mean the user is going to spend a long time on your website.

Have fun reading and scrolling 😉

When building a product one often wants to provide a solution to a real problem. But that is rarely sufficient to develop an enjoyable product which users can’t stop thinking about.

Here is where user testing comes in. By involving users in the product development process, companies can incorporate feedback in every product development stage.

In this article, we want to give you an introduction on what user testing is and why it is necessary. For an in-depth exploration of the topic, please see our ebook on “How to build products users love”. Happy reading!

Even if you don’t greet each user personally: each time a user visits your website, you are communicating with them. Through the design of your website.

How this works?

Communication on your website works on different levels and ranges from text, pictures and the structure of a site to colours, titles and buttons. In this blog post I want to explain how communication on a website works and what you can do to improve it.

Let’s go!

When you’ve created a piece of software and follow the SaaS model, you will most likely be offering a free trial to your users. During this trial, your user can test the product and decide if he needs it.

And that is the hard part. You have to show the user why he or she needs your product and that its use is easy and pleasant.

That’s why I want to give you some tips about how to make a good impression and create an outstanding user onboarding experience.

Let’s go!

Imagine this. The web designer of your team has spent the last week working on design drafts for a new website of yours. She perfectly highlighted user stories and designed all possible user interactions on that particular site.

She presents the design drafts and user stories to the team. And her design presentation ends with a simple: “And guys, what do you think?”.

A few weeks ago, we published a blog post introducing different methods of on boarding. Due to the positive feedback, we decided to go back and write another blog post on this topic. A lot of users only sign up for an application but never actually end up using it.

How do you convince more users to activate the application? How do you turn sign-ups into active users?

Today we want to share 5 tips about how to create a successful user on boarding experience. Let’s go!