We at Usersnap love 404 pages. Don’t get me wrong. We don’t want our website visitors, customers, and users to see our 404 page. Because it would mean that something went wrong. A broken link or some other mixup.

But if someone happens to see our 404 page, she should get at least some fun out of it. And luckily we’re not alone here. More and more software companies are putting fantastic 404 pages out there.

I love to write. For me, writing is a special place where I feel good and happy.

Writing is so much more for me than just the process of writing. It motivates me, it educates me, it inspires me, it connects me with like-minded people.

Just recently, I discovered something pretty awesome. In the last 18 months, I have written 200+ articles. That’s 11 articles per month or 2,75 articles per week. It might not sound a lot for some people, but for me it definitely is.

These are the top 7 things I’ve learned about writing design articles, development tutorials, and reviews on tools and frameworks. I’m grateful for each lesson, and I’m excited to learn more as I continue my journey.

We often hear the phrase “prevention is better than cure”. It’s gotten a bit old over time, but that doesn’t make it any less true.

This phrase sums up the zest of the article you’re going to read now. Before you roll out any product, you always test it. You basically just make sure that everything you designed is there and it works exactly like you designed it.

Today, it is no longer sufficient to design a product that just works. Products need to have an amazing user experience to stand out from the crowd, to be successful, and to have a user base, who enjoys using them. In a nutshell: products need to be more than mere functional.

The designers Don Norman and Aarron Walter are asking this question for decades: How can design evoke positive and memorable experiences?

In this post, I want to explore the topic of emotional design. I will draw on research by Norman and Walter, and will ask why we enjoy using some products and others not. Hope you enjoy reading this post!

Buttons are a simple element of interactive design, used everyday by people browsing the web. As web design has changed over time and new trends appeared every now and then, the design of buttons evolved too.

The challenge of button design is quite simple: Buttons must be designed in a way that they are recognized as buttons and users can expect the action which is followed by the button.

In this article, I’ll give you an overview of the evolution of button design and how to create modern web buttons.

Sometimes I feel a bit overwhelmed by the sheer amount of content in the field of project management. Especially when looking on the tool-side of project management, I see new tools popping up every other day.

With JIRA and Trello – we looked at two major project management tools, their benefits and drawbacks and most importantly their main differences.

So if you’re thinking about making the switch to JIRA or Trello. This article is the right place for you.

Your choice of web host is vital to your success online. A poor web host can impact your bottom line by slowing your website, causing frequent downtime, and overall contributing to a poor customer experience.

Jumping in with the first host you find can prove to be a huge mistake. Here are six other mistakes to avoid when choosing a web host.

Developers and designers have very different job profiles. In fact, they also have very different perspectives, i.e. different ways in which they look at the same thing.

One example: While a website designer looks at the whole external feel of a design, sets the scope for it and decides on how people connect with it, the job of a developer is very different. He or she is the one who has to make that idea work seamlessly on the inside, using code to its best advantage.

With job descriptions that are so different, there is one thing that is of extreme importance: how the idea of the “external” web design connects with the internal workings of the project in order to make it a seamless experience.

Only when developers and designers work as a team, will the end user be able to truly benefit from the application. It’s only then that they will get a product that looks great, is easy to use and is relatively error-free.

So, today we’re going to look at the communication between developers and designers. And how we can improve it.