In a recent Offscreen magazine issue, Eric Meyer, a famous consultant, author, and web designer explains why he stopped calling himself a “web designer” and prefers the title “experience designer” instead.

In the realm of the design world today, the term “web design” has become something of an understatement, especially when we look at where web design has come from compared to 20 years ago.

The traditional idea of web design has evolved tremendously, especially in the last couple of years. The web is all around us, no matter if we think about smart bubbles, glasses, or other IoT devices. I guess the pioneers of the web, would be surprised in which devices web design can be found nowadays.

Reading through Microsoft’s 1995 Interface Guidelines is like unearthing a lost relic. The 381-page tome — for designers creating Windows apps — got me thinking about how much has changed, not only with Microsoft but with software overall. The guidelines are ahead of their time.

They’re concerned with helping the user get to grips with the OS, and there’s a focus on empathy and a hint Microsoft is starting to think about UX. That’s which isn’t something Windows 3.1 makes any effort to do. On first run, you’re thrown into this jumble:

WordPress is a great tool. In fact, about 50% of all websites out there use WordPress. So, it’s no wonder that when you’re thinking of starting a blog for your company or simply develop a new website, WordPress is one of the first things that comes to mind.

But it isn’t all sunshine and rainbows and sometimes, you’re better off looking elsewhere. At least you should consider other alternatives to WordPress before getting starting without losing even a thought.

I’m super happy to work with a company that puts a lot of energy into the quality assurance part of every single software development project.

Quality assurance is a discipline that’s overlooked and under-appreciated. We produce software, share it with the team, test it, collect feedback, ask beta testers and then do it over again. Share, test, collect, ask, repeat. Yup, that’s pretty much it.

Yet people treat quality assurance as something superficial – a few tests here, a few user feedback there, and with one big eye staring at the release button.

Want to learn web development but don’t know where to start?

We all know that the Internet these days provides tons of opportunities for self-starters to do just that; get started. Gone are the days where you are required to pay an exorbitant amount of money to learn the skills needed to succeed.

There are countless amazing developers who are generous with their knowledge posting tutorials online.

Nowhere is this more prominent than YouTube – the world’s second largest search engine.

In this collection, you’ll find the top 10 YouTubers who publish web development tutorials on their channels. Check out the list below to help you accelerate your dev & design game today.

Building a global SaaS product isn’t easy. You have to localize your product, translate your website, and make sure that everything’s still up and running.

And there might be a major interface problem, which looks like a tiny thing at first but is actually something to think about a little longer. What I’m talking about is the visualization of selecting a language. How can you visualize the option to change languages so that your global audience can choose which language they want to use?

In this article, you’ll find everything you need to know when it comes to designing a language switch for your application or website, including some examples and best practices.