Keeping up with new trends and tactics is important as you develop successful web strategies for your clients. Conversely, it’s just as important to realize when it’s time to retire older practices that have been shown to be problematic.

Web design and best practices for user experience continue to evolve, but it’s amazing to see how much old, ineffective work is still hanging around out there. Many websites have been around since before we had a clear understanding of the value of conversions and how to create a clear path to success.

Use this checklist to help identify and understand, eliminate, and replace those web elements that have no place on a website in 2017.

Atom, the code editor from GitHub, was initially released in May 2014 by the team of GitHub. As an open-source editor Atom became hugely popular over the last two years. And for some it’s the Sublime killer. And I’m not exaggerating.

Today, I’m going to show you the best tips, tricks, and shortcuts while using Atom. So better go pro with Atom.

There’s a ton of great content out there on how to onboard new users, how to treat them well, and how to make sure that they understand your product, its benefits, and become paying customers.

However, there’s less information available on how you should treat your users who want to end the relationship with you.

We at Usersnap looked into the topic of user offboarding and provide you with the following essentials for how to end relationships with your customers and users.

Just recently I found myself in a situation which required instant design feedback. I like exchanging thoughts and ideas through real-time conversations, however, I wasn’t prepared for the question: “What do you think about this design draft?

And seconds later, I was providing unthoughtful design feedback.

In this article, I’m going to elaborate on the benefits of asynchronous design feedback, and why you should give it a try as well.

In today’s guest post, Rainer Stropek, co-founder of software architects, gives us some insights on how to evaluate PaaS solutions in order to find the best one for your product.

At the moment, we are working on a SaaS project in which IoT (Internet of Things) plays an important part. While reviewing my work from the past weeks I was surprised to see how my work as a software architect has changed since we made the move to Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS).

In this article, I’d like to provide you with a guide on how to evaluate other PaaS services.