When we started Usersnap we wanted to help people in Web Development and Design to focus on the more important stuff in life than handling endless Email support conversations. That’s why we are starting a new series in our blog, called “Picture My Work”. In this series we ask designers and web devs to give us a little sneak peak into their daily work routines, their values, their tools and what they like / dislike about their work.

I am thrilled to kick off this series with Gregory Koberger, formerly at Mozilla, who recently published his Startup Notes, a beautiful, concise summary of the YCombinator Startup School 2013. You should follow him on Twitter: @gkoberger

1. Tell us about your work in 140 characters.
I’m a programmer-turned-designer who uses design as a way to make the content more accessible.

2. What is good design for you personally?

In a series of blog posts, we’ll discuss web design’s best practices when it comes to usability, responsiveness and accessibility. We care about great design and we’d love to show you that a little CSS love goes a long way. In this post I’ll look at the Twitter search form, to replicate its elegant design.

Recreating the Twitter search form

Now Twitter wraps it’s elements in a whole lot of divs and spans. I’ll drill it down to the input-element and button, to keep things accessible. Using only HTML, our search form looks a bit ‘boxy’.

In a series of blog posts, we’ll discuss web design’s best practices when it comes to usability, responsiveness and accessibility. We care about great design and we’d love to show you that a little CSS love goes a long way. In this post I’ll look at the Gmail send button, to replicate its clear blue design for your actions.

I went ahead and replicated the necessary HTML and CSS and saved it on Codepen for you to play around with:

In a series of blog posts, we’ll discuss web design’s best practices when it comes to usability, responsiveness and accessibility. We care about great design and we’d love to show you that a little CSS love goes a long way. In this post, I’ll show you how to create a neat notification bar, as it’s currently in place on WordPress.org.