User testing is a bit like sports.

Almost everyone agrees that it is essential, but only a few manage to do it regularly.

Quite often getting your product tested by real people is skipped because of budget constraints and exploding costs in development.

Furthermore, this misconception is fueled by usability professionals frequently charging up to $15,000 to run a simple usability study.

But user testing doesn’t necessarily have to break the bank. Here’s what you can do with a budget of only $100.

More and more web applications are being developed these days. And with each line of code being written, the potential for bugs arises.

Generally speaking, the costs of fixing bugs increase exponentially the later you find them.

The Systems Sciences Institute at IBM found that “the cost to fix an error found after product release was 4 to 5 times more than one uncovered during design, and up to 100 times more than one identified in the maintenance phase”.

And a study by the University of Cambridge found that software bugs cause economic damage of $312 billion per year worldwide.

These numbers highlight the importance of finding bugs as early as possible and to thoroughly test an application before it is released.

That is where web application testing comes in. Web application testing usually consists of multiple steps that ensure that an application is fully functional and runs smoothly and securely. It is an essential part of web development and ensures that an app is running properly before its release.

We put together a 6-step guide, which should give you an overview of what kind of tests to run to test your app.

Let’s get started!

When interacting with our customers and blog readers, we usually find that everyone has a different set of ideas on proper user testing workflows. Blame it on the inconsistencies when it comes to the terminology of User Testing, Usability Testing or User Acceptance Testing. The need for clarification on this topic is certainly huge.

In this blog post, I will try to bring some light into the fields of Usability Testing as well as User Acceptance Testing. I will also highlight the main differences of both areas. Check out what user testing is all about.