Following the responsive design approach for your website, at one point you’ll need to think about what to do with your navigation element(s). Since responsive web-design became a ‘thing’ a few patterns have developed on how to deal with site navigation. As the digital real estate is limited on smartphones, also the navigation concept of websites and web-applications needs to be redefined. How to make your site navigation responsive? Let’s take a look at some popular sites to illustrate the benefits and drawbacks of their solution to the navigation problem on mobile devices.

Last Saturday the Viennese chapter of the international movement Pyladies kicked off what will become a series of meetups, with a beginners workshop to Python. PyLadies aims to provide a friendly support network for women and a bridge to the larger Python world. Why? Well, because we’d like to see more diversity in the tech world, and with only 17% (and declining!) of the industries jobs filled by women, we have a long way to go!  That’s why anyone with an interest in Python was encouraged to participate (and yes, that means guys too). The attendees (both students and coaches) dragged friends, boyfriends, husbands and family members along for a day of coding bliss at Sektor5.

Both because part of the Usersnap team holds office at Sektor5, and because we’re proud Pythonista’s ourselves, we were happy to (co)sponsor this event. Being one of the organizers this post might turn out a bit biased, but we really had a lot of fun. And I think we learned heaps about where to improve for a next edition!

We started at half past ten, going through the Python track on Codecademy (who happily supported the event). With so many people interested in coaching (the Python community in Vienna rocks!), more advanced attendees could ask very specific questions and we saw a lot of one-on-one coaching sessions.

In a series of blog posts, we’ll discuss web design’s best practices when it comes to usability, responsiveness and accessibility. We care about great design and we’d love to show you that a little CSS love goes a long way. In  this post I’ll look at the pretty rounded avatar my Google+ profile is sporting.

I love how the rounded images makes practically every profile picture look nice and friendly. To figure out how Google+ went about this, I went ahead and replicated the necessary HTML and CSS and saved it on Codepen. Feel free to play around with it and use is for your own page!

We are excited to announce that Usersnap now supports 4k ultra high definition screens when it comes to capturing and displaying screenshots. This means if you are the proud owner of one of those shiny quad full HD displays, we can cope with your high resolution and we produce Retina* screen captures.

The Opportunity

Retina/HiDPI displays (and all future high resolution screens) are designed to reduce eyestrain and should lead to more reading. Usability expert Jakob Nielsen praised the Retina iPad’s display for its more enjoyable user experience, highlighting the ‘crispness’ of typography. What does one do with the significant amount of more pixels per inch? Very little, looking at the benefits for an average consumer. For (web) designers however, it makes the difference between something looking good and it being absolutely pixel perfect.

In a series of blog posts, we’ll discuss web design’s best practices when it comes to usability, responsiveness and accessibility. We care about great design and we’d love to show you that a little CSS love goes a long way. In this post, I’ll recreate Kippt’s ‘learn more’ button, that should tempt you to go for their pro plan.

In a series of blog posts, we’ll discuss web design’s best practices when it comes to usability, responsiveness and accessibility. We care about great design and we’d love to show you that a little CSS love goes a long way. In this post, I’ll show you how to create a neat notification bar, as it’s currently in place on WordPress.org.

Nowadays – when building a website – one is confronted with a number of different sizes and browsers that is daunting.* Plus, with mobile adoption skyrocketing, the diversity of mobile devices on the market doesn’t fail to grow exponentially. Thank god / the vivid web design community no custom coding is needed for each device or screen size with current responsive web design frameworks and testing tools.

We’ve selected 6 tools and libraries to get you started with responsive web design:

Bootstrap

Built at Twitter by Mark Otto and Jacob Thornton, Bootstrap offers an easy configurable CSS front-end framework. Bootstrap was made to not only look and behave great in the latest desktop browsers (as well as IE7!), but also in tablet and smartphone browsers with a 12-column responsive grid, dozens of components, JavaScript plugins, typography, form controls, and has a web-based Customizer. Bootstrap comes in different shapes and forms, like Google BootstrapRetriever Bootstrap and the super fun (and equally ugly) Geo Bootstrap.

Responsive Web Design (RWD) is a design approach aimed at crafting sites to provide an optimal viewing experience. That means: easy reading and navigation with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling across a gradient of different devices. At Usersnap we think a great deal of Responsive Design. Simply re-size your browser window, or open this blog on your smartphone, and you’ll know what we’re talking about.

Ethan Marcotte coined the term responsive web design in a May 2010 article in A List Apart. He then described the theory and practice of responsive web design in his 2011 book Responsive Web Design. Subsequently, Responsive Web Design was listed second in Top Web Design Trends for 2012 by .net magazine. Mashable called 2013 the Year of Responsive Web Design, as they see a ‘major shift in the consumption habits of their audience:


OnTime
started, as so many great products and tools, as a solution to a personal pain. As a senior consultant and project manager, Hamid Shojaee, built OnTime for himself, to track who in his team was working on what, in an agile way. Today, OnTime has grown to a mature project management suite, particularly powerful to manage scrum projects, sprints and teams while maintaining a perfect overview of every project’s progress.

OnTime’s products are designed from the ground up to be easy to use with built-in tutorials and plenty of supporting resources. In this blog post, I’ll show how to add an easy way to continuously receive visual feedback in OnTime with Usersnap.