How to use Asana for bug tracking!

Can web development be made easier, simpler, quicker, and more transparent? I guess that’s the question that keeps management and executives awake a lot of the time.

Whilst developers focus on techniques, patterns, principles and developmental concepts management, in contrast, is more focused on the broader picture, understanding where a project is at, will it meet its deadline, did it overrun and by how much. Here’s how to use Asana for bug tracking.

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Easily add a Screenshot to FogBugz issues, no Download required

FogBugz is the old lady of Bugtracking, around since 2000 (!), provided by FogCreek, the software company of the good saint of all programmers, Joel Spolsky. Back from the day when Joel helped create what legions of business people now use for a daily living (Microsoft Excel) a lot of experience and attitude formed this bugtracker, that aims at helping software teams deliver better products.

We thought: this old lady needs some new accessories and integrated Usersnap into FogBugz, because a screenshot often paints a thousand words and helps you deliver great products faster. So give the little Kiwi some love and add Usersnap to your FogBugz bugtracker.

WHAT INFO WILL YOU GET?

Usersnap allows your testers to provide a visual description of what might be a bug in form of annotated screenshots. Additionally you will get important information such as the used browser, the used operating system and the URL where the bug has occurred. Your testers can choose between a drawing pen, a highlighting tool and sticky notes to illustrate and annotate the bug report. With that little Screenshot Tool enabled you’ll get so much more out of the bug reports in FogBugz.

OK, I’M IN. HOW ABOUT INTEGRATION?

Easy. Just add a little code snippet to the page, just like you did with Google Analytics (TM). That’s it.

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Collect better bug reports with Pivotal Tracker and Usersnap

Pivotal Tracker is a collaborative, lightwight agile project management tool, brought to you by the experts in agile software development: Pivotal Labs. Pivotal Tracker helps bring everyone, even distributed teams, into the same virtual room.

It allows you to deliver on Customer Feedback, respond to changing needs and new requirements easily and supercharge your agile project teams with real time collaboration.

Usersnap integrates with Pivotal Tracker, helping you communicate effectively about issues with your users and share feedback between developers, customers and quality assurance engineers. Speed up your development process by hooking up Usersnap and Pivotal Tracker.

Working on a web project?

Getting annotated screenshots attached to bug reports will raise a smile on every developer’s face. Usersnap allows your testers to provide a visual description of what might be a bug in form of annotated screenshots. Additionally you will get important information such as the used browser, the used operating system and the URL where the bug has occured. Your testers can choose between a drawing pen, a highlighting tool and sticky notes to illustrate and annotate the bug report. To enable Usersnap on your web project, a snippet of code has to be added, which is as simple as installing Google Analytics (TM). After that, a feedback-button appears and one can collect bug reports directly in Pivotal Tracker. Continue Reading “Collect better bug reports with Pivotal Tracker and Usersnap”

Save Bug Fixing time with Usersnap

At Usersnap we strongly believe that an improved feedback and communication process will save you (and your team) a lot of time spent on communication in your development process. Picking the right communication tools does not only directly result in better workflows but also affects the time needed to fix a bug which is particularly important if you are publishing your code continuously.

Communication: Development costs’ secret hideout

Phone calls, meetings, IM chats and screen sharing sessions are efficient ways to discuss bugs and planned improvements of every software development project. There are two stashed requirements here: two people need to communicate at the same time. This is not a roadblock if you are sharing a desk but it can be a challenge if you are working in a distributed team or if you simply don’t want to interrupt your colleagues.

On the downside, one-on-one communication is only effective if nobody else needs to be involved after the topics have been discussed. As the famous group intercommunication formula for a team of N people still is N*(N-1)/2, even small teams should focus on effective communication to reduce the communication overhead.

If you are working in a startup environment (e.g. a team of 10) and take into account that some issues will be reported by your customers (e.g. +10 people you should listen to) you easily end up with 190 possible combinations of one-on-one communications streams. Online SaaS productivity tools like bug trackers and project management tools are basically striving to solve this problem by enabling people to communicate in groups, asynchronously. Anyways, the root cause of misunderstandings lies somewhere else.

The inconvenient truth about bug reports

Well, crafted bug tracking tools help you to keep up with the communication challenge. However, in the end, clients will send bug reports and feature request by email which will lack the context of the perceived bug and might read as:

“The blue button does not work”

This is exactly what’s perceived but there is little help here for solving the bug as it requires to guess the context of this bug. Specifically, in web development, it is common to deal with browser-specific bugs (“It works in Chrome but not in Internet Explorer”). Also, the rise of responsive web design introduces another important information to reproduce perceived issues on web project: the current user’s browser size. Developers know what’s necessary to reproduce a bug but clients and users who want to report bugs may not understand why a good bug report necessarily needs some contextual information.

If you are exceptionally lucky those emails might contain a word document with the collected issue or even a PowerPoint presentation with sketches of your clients’ suggested UI improvements. Continue Reading “Save Bug Fixing time with Usersnap”

Getting things done with Asana and Usersnap

Asana is a shared task list for your team, keeping everyone on the same page. Asana’s mission is to empower humanity to do great things. Dustin Moskovitz and Justin Rosenstein, both Facebook alumni, created the project management tool to help take that step; to improve the productivity of individuals and groups. Implementing it at Facebook, the results were promising: fewer meetings, the volume of emails went down and the teams got more done with less effort.

Now we are all-in for less emails, especially the ones that come with a subject along the lines of “It does not work, FIX IT“. To help your visitors, customers and team members describe what they (don’t) see on a page you need a visual feedback tool. Working with Asana already? That’s great, then we only have to connect your Usersnap account to your Asana dashboard!

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Using Typo3? Add the Bug Tracker Usersnap to your CMS!

TYPO3 is an enterprise-class, open source content management system, used to build and manage websites of all types. One of the great things about TYPO3 is that one can add new types of content elements fairly easily. Say, for instance, a feedback button for your visitors and customers. We are working on a plugin, but in the meantime, here are the needed steps to include Usersnap – the visual bug tracker for web development – into your Typo3 site:

  1. Log into your backend
  2. Left Menu: Click on “Template”
  3. Select your start page (earth icon)
  4. Select “Info/Modify” in the Dropdown menu of the template
  5. Click on the edit button next to setup (pencil icon) – it’s the last entry in the table
  6. A editor opens, insert this code (with your Usersnap snippet) at the end:

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Identify and fix bugs with Trac and Usersnap

Trac is a bug tracking system for software development projects. Tracs mission is to help developers writing great software while staying out of the way and should as such impose as little as possible on a team’s established development process. Its timeline shows all current and past project events in order, creating an overview of projects and their progress, and a roadmap lists the upcoming milestones. Identifying bugs and enriching tickets with annotated screenshots with crucial meta-information, that is where the Usersnap integration comes in!

Sign up for your 15-days free trial, or log in to your Usersnap account, and edit the settings for your website. To use the Trac integration, you need to enable the xmlrpc-plugin. Download it from XML RPC-Plugin, copy the egg inside your plugins-directory or install it system wide. You need to enable it by adding tracrpc.* Continue Reading “Identify and fix bugs with Trac and Usersnap”

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