In the past, the core goal of testing is to find bugs and fix them. But the dynamics of IT and testing landscape have changed now.

Agile QA approach and user experience driven development (UXDD) have taken modern software development and testing by storm.

Are your QA testers up to speed?

As a QA tester or manager, how you scale up your skills to match today’s innovative challenges is the key to improving testing productivity and advancing your career prospects.

As a Quality Assurance Manager, you’re fighting daily with testing websites or software during the build process, as well as after launch.

With this comparison between automated vs. manual testing, we want to help you to make a quicker decision what to use. The current trend in everything becoming more automated, that goes for software and website testing too.

But when is it better to use automated testing versus manual testing?

Is manual still better to use in some situations? Let’s take a look.

Mistakes are inevitable. We’re only human, after all. But when it comes to delivering software or websites to our clients, we want to make that happen with as few errors as possible. It sounds like a great goal, but how do you systematically achieve it?

The key to minimizing errors is to design a quality assurance process that is efficient and reliable. In this article, I discuss exactly how to do that, whether your company is big or small or a one (wo)man show.

Every step should be designed with that simple point in mind, that we are in fact only human. Even the most detail-oriented person will be more effective with a clear and consistent system than relying on their skill alone.

I’m super happy to work with a company that puts a lot of energy into the quality assurance part of every single software development project.

Quality assurance is a discipline that’s overlooked and under-appreciated. We produce software, share it with the team, test it, collect feedback, ask beta testers and then do it over again. Share, test, collect, ask, repeat. Yup, that’s pretty much it.

Yet people treat quality assurance as something superficial – a few tests here, a few user feedback there, and with one big eye staring at the release button.

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