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I have a love/hate relationship with test driven development and unit testing.

I’ve been both an ardent supporter of these “best practices,” but I’ve also been more than skeptical of their use.

One of the big problems in software development is when developers—or sometimes managers—who mean well apply “best practices” simply because they are best practices and don’t understand their reason or actual use.

To check out John’s first article on software development methodologies, please go here

One of my first official jobs in the software development industry was that of a tester.

My job entailed looking at stacks of papers that were printed out by a new printer we were testing at HP and comparing them to the “master” printouts produced by older printers.

I didn’t actually do the comparison of the pages myself; instead, I would execute the tests, someone else would compare the printouts, and I’d look at the differences they flagged.

With each difference, I would review and decide, based on the test, whether the result was a true failure or defect. If it was the latter, I’d write up a defect report for a developer to look at—and possibly fix.

The following is an excerpt from The Complete Software Developer’s Career Guide by John Sonmez. To get the entire book delivered to your inbox, go here.

Are you ready to put on your boxing gloves and enter the ring?

Are you ready to be confused?

Are you ready to endlessly debate semantics? To hire expensive consultants to tell you what you are doing wrong and coach your team to higher levels by getting everyone “certified?”

Well, welcome to the world of software development methodologies.

Working on a website launch or software update can be pretty stressful, and sometimes chaotic. We’ve all experienced the last-minute changes, new ideas and customer requests coming in right before you hit the “publish” button.

And then there are those moments where you wonder: “Have I already told John to fix this bug?“. And “Have I followed-up with John on…“, when what you really mean is something like: “Have I forwarded this Usersnap screen to our JIRA project for John to work on?”, “Ah…btw: Is there an update from John on this other Usersnap screen?”

Luckily, there’s help on the way. With the latest update from Usersnap, questions like these are a thing of the past.

If you are like me you would rather try to balance a laptop, coffee mug, charger, mouse, and your notes all at once rather than walking from your desk to the conference room twice.

A similar dynamic is at work when it comes to managing feedback or planning and tracking software development processes. You want to easily prioritize and assign a task and if possible – tackle multiple tasks at once.

That’s where our new feature comes in: Bulk Editing. Bulk Editing is a fast, flexible new way for you and your team to collaborate, manage, and organize internal or external feedback.

We Are Developers. That’s the claim and motto of the largest developer event in Europe.

And since we at Usersnap are developers, too, we put on our best suits (well, just kidding 😉) and attended this year’s largest developer event, right in Vienna.

Together with 3.800 other developers from all over Europe we were pretty impressed by the organizers work and listened closely to speakers like John Romero, Joel Spolsky, and Håkon Wium Lie.

In this article, we’d like to share a few conference highlights from this year.

More and more web applications are being developed these days. And with each line of code being written, the potential for bugs arises.

Generally speaking, the costs of fixing bugs increase exponentially the later you find them.

The Systems Sciences Institute at IBM found that “the cost to fix an error found after product release was four to five times as much as one uncovered during design, and up to 100 times more than one identified in the maintenance phase”.

And a study by the University of Cambridge found that software bugs cause economic damage of $312 billion per year worldwide.

These numbers highlight the importance of finding bugs as early as possible and to thoroughly test an application before it is released.

That is where web application testing comes in. Web application testing usually consists of multiple steps that ensure that an application is fully functional and runs smoothly and securely. It is an essential part of web development and ensures that an app is running properly before its release.

We put together a 6-step guide, which should give you an overview of what kind of tests to run to test your app.

Let’s get started!

Meet the CTO is a new series about CTOs, their daily lives, roles, and responsibilities. This week, we talk to Jan Varljen, CTO of Productive.

Jan shares his story of starting out as a web developer at one of the largest agencies in Croatia. As the CTO of Productive.io, Jan is now managing a team of developers building the next generation of agency software.

Visibility of system status is one of the most important rules of UI design. The goal behind this rule is pretty obvious — to minimize user tension you should provide feedback to the user about what is happening with the app within a reasonable amount of time. Don’t keep the users guessing — tell the user what’s happening. And one of the most common forms of such feedback is a progress indicator.

In this article, we’ll give you an overview of the main types of progress indicators and the use cases for them.