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We often hear the phrase “prevention is better than cure”. It’s gotten a bit old over time, but that doesn’t make it any less true.

This phrase sums up the zest of the article you’re going to read now. Before you roll out any product, you always test it. You basically just make sure that everything you designed is there and it works exactly like you designed it.

Not long ago we published the post “Bug tracking explained in funny GIFs“. We had a lot of fun writing it and got a lot of positive reactions. Therefore, we decided to write another post about a topic that is equally relevant to us: User Acceptance Testing. Many of our customers use Usersnap for User Acceptance Testing and we have written a few serious articles about this topic.

If you are new here: User Acceptance Testing is often the last step in software development. The idea is to test if a product works for the user. If you want to read more about how to get started with UAT we have some interesting articles for you. If are just here for the fun, read on! 🙂

In the last couple of weeks, we’ve given you a deeper look into the world of User Acceptance Testing. And over this period of time, we have received questions on the workflows and processes behind UAT.

It’s quite a special topic for us too, since our bug tracking- & testing software is used by a variety of people and companies helping them in their User Acceptance Testing efforts.

In today’s blog post I’d like to show you what the actual workflow of UAT looks like. From planning to executing and to analyzing your UAT efforts.

Let’s get started.

When interacting with our customers and blog readers, we usually find that everyone has a different set of ideas on proper user testing workflows. Blame it on the inconsistencies when it comes to the terminology of User Testing, Usability Testing or User Acceptance Testing. The need for clarification on this topic is certainly huge.

In this blog post, I will try to bring some light into the fields of Usability Testing as well as User Acceptance Testing. I will also highlight the main differences of both areas. Check out what user testing is all about.

This article is brought to you by Usersnap, a user testing tool that helps you to communicate visually. Get a 15-day free trial here.

The methodology of User Acceptance Testing (UAT) is pretty straight-forward. The implementation itself requires some in-depth knowledge on the available types of User Acceptance Testing, though.

User Acceptance Testing is the process of verifying that a created solution/software works for ‘the user’. This might sound easy enough but, in practice, it isn’t.

To make your journey into User Acceptance Testing a bit easier, we researched the 5 most common types of User Acceptance Testing you have to consider.

This article is brought to you by Usersnap, your solution for building great digital projects. Get a 15-day free trial here.

Bold statement right? But of all forms of testing, user acceptance testing is often the most essential to get right. Why? Because when implemented correctly, it’s the most effective in reducing both time and cost, whilst increasing customer satisfaction. User Acceptance Testing, also known as UAT (or UAT testing), in a nutshell, is:

A process of verifying that a solution works for the user.

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