Eric Meyer: we’ve got the solution for your problem!

Eric Meyer, a renown web consultant, wrote a post on the problem of receiving and processing feedback on his own blog, meyerweb.com, and highlighting small things like typos on other blogs, without writing lengthy emails. “As I was reading an article with a few scattered apostrophe errors, I wished that I could highlight each one, hit a report button, and know that the author had been notified of the errors so that they could fix them.  No requirement to leave a comment chastising them for bad grammar, replete with lots of textual context so they could find the errors. (…)”

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How to set up Usersnap for your WordPress blog

In the spirit of eating one’s own dog food, I installed the Usersnap plugin for WordPress on my blog. Not only can I now send myself annotated screenshots of things I should really tackle when I’ll work on my website next, creating a very visual to do list, but additionally my readers can highlight typos or widgetty stuff they’d like to see improved. And I can collect that feedback in one place, in a separate folder in my inbox. Which is great, because I used to receive feedback scattered all over the place. My mom would send me a direct message on Twitter, issuing me to ‘mind my language’, and grammar enthusiasts would directly mention me or reply to the post in question. Which doesn’t look all that professional, and blocks discussions on the actual topic of the post.

All in all, Usersnap made my life as a blogger easier. Let me walk you trough the – dead easy – set up. I downloaded the plugin and uploaded it to my ftp-server. You could also just download it directly in the WordPress Plugin environment, I just like to have a copy of everything I use in a folder on my computer.

Then I activated the plugin in the plugins directory of my blog. Continue Reading “How to set up Usersnap for your WordPress blog”

5 steps to make bug-fixing fun again

Working with bug tracking software can be an extreme pain for the communication/marketing side of your startup. Oftentimes using one or more tools alongside is forced upon them and they don’t always have the notion how important browser- or OS specifics are. Believe me, I’ve been on both sides. If your communications team won’t happily help their programming co workers optimizing the side, how can you expect your users or customers to do so?

Let’s talk about how to make bug-fixing fun again!

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