Web Design Tidbits #3: Google+ rounded avatar

In a series of blog posts, we’ll discuss web design’s best practices when it comes to usability, responsiveness and accessibility. We care about great design and we’d love to show you that a little CSS love goes a long way. In  this post I’ll look at the pretty rounded avatar my Google+ profile is sporting.

I love how the rounded images makes practically every profile picture look nice and friendly. To figure out how Google+ went about this, I went ahead and replicated the necessary HTML and CSS and saved it on Codepen. Feel free to play around with it and use is for your own page! Continue Reading “Web Design Tidbits #3: Google+ rounded avatar”

Usersnap ‘does’ retina too

We are excited to announce that Usersnap now supports 4k ultra high definition screens when it comes to capturing and displaying screenshots. This means if you are the proud owner of one of those shiny quad full HD displays, we can cope with your high resolution and we produce Retina* screen captures.

The Opportunity

Retina/HiDPI displays (and all future high resolution screens) are designed to reduce eyestrain and should lead to more reading. Usability expert Jakob Nielsen praised the Retina iPad’s display for its more enjoyable user experience, highlighting the ‘crispness’ of typography. What does one do with the significant amount of more pixels per inch? Very little, looking at the benefits for an average consumer. For (web) designers however, it makes the difference between something looking good and it being absolutely pixel perfect. Continue Reading “Usersnap ‘does’ retina too”

Web Design Tidbits #2: Kippt gradient button

In a series of blog posts, we’ll discuss web design’s best practices when it comes to usability, responsiveness and accessibility. We care about great design and we’d love to show you that a little CSS love goes a long way. In this post, I’ll recreate Kippt’s ‘learn more’ button, that should tempt you to go for their pro plan.

Continue Reading “Web Design Tidbits #2: Kippt gradient button”

Responsive web design tips from the community

In a previous post, 6 tools to get you started with Responsive Web Design, we selected and discussed 6 tools and libraries to help you get started with – really – responsive web design. We received loads of positive feedback and additional tips and tricks from our followers and decided to collect them in another post about one of our favorite subjects. Here we go:

Continue Reading “Responsive web design tips from the community”

Web Design Tidbits #1: WordPress.org’s notification bar

In a series of blog posts, we’ll discuss web design’s best practices when it comes to usability, responsiveness and accessibility. We care about great design and we’d love to show you that a little CSS love goes a long way. In this post, I’ll show you how to create a neat notification bar, as it’s currently in place on WordPress.org.

Continue Reading “Web Design Tidbits #1: WordPress.org’s notification bar”

6 tools to get started with responsive web design

Nowadays – when building a website – one is confronted with a number of different sizes and browsers that is daunting.* Plus, with mobile adoption skyrocketing, the diversity of mobile devices on the market doesn’t fail to grow exponentially. Thank god / the vivid web design community no custom coding is needed for each device or screen size with current responsive web design frameworks and testing tools.

We’ve selected 6 tools and libraries to get you started with responsive web design:

Bootstrap

Built at Twitter by Mark Otto and Jacob Thornton, Bootstrap offers an easy configurable CSS front-end framework. Bootstrap was made to not only look and behave great in the latest desktop browsers (as well as IE7!), but also in tablet and smartphone browsers with a 12-column responsive grid, dozens of components, JavaScript plugins, typography, form controls, and has a web-based Customizer. Bootstrap comes in different shapes and forms, like Google BootstrapRetriever Bootstrap and the super fun (and equally ugly) Geo Bootstrap. Continue Reading “6 tools to get started with responsive web design”

An Intro to Responsive Web Design

Responsive Web Design (RWD) is a design approach aimed at crafting sites to provide an optimal viewing experience. That means: easy reading and navigation with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling across a gradient of different devices. At Usersnap we think a great deal of Responsive Design. Simply re-size your browser window, or open this blog on your smartphone, and you’ll know what we’re talking about.

Ethan Marcotte coined the term responsive web design in a May 2010 article in A List Apart. He then described the theory and practice of responsive web design in his 2011 book Responsive Web Design. Subsequently, Responsive Web Design was listed second in Top Web Design Trends for 2012 by .net magazine. Mashable called 2013 the Year of Responsive Web Design, as they see a ‘major shift in the consumption habits of their audience: Continue Reading “An Intro to Responsive Web Design”

Grab your Usersnap jQuery plugin on GitHub

For everyone who doesn’t want to dig around in their source code to add the JavaScript snippet needed to get Usersnap up and running on your site: there is a plugin for that! You can grab our jQuery plugin at GitHub.

There is even a full example page explaining the jQuery plugin inside the
repo: example.html. Add the small plugin, in the jQuery syntax you’re already comfortable with, and there’s no need to mess around in your front-end. All the more time to focus on growing your business!

We invite you to try out our service for free. Sign up for our 15-days trial program!

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